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increasingly remote. let's see what happens behind the scenes there. >> i have heard, wolf, israel says if there's not some sort of cease-fire agreed to on behalf of gaza that a ground war will begin soon. what are you hearing? >> reporter: well, that's what the israelis are saying. the prime minister of israel, benjamin netanyahu in his cabinet meeting yesterday made that point. they're not going to wait forever. we do know that there have been a lot of international efforts to get a cease-fire, including an israeli envoy, a special envoy who went to cairo to meet with egyptian officials. the egyptian government, president mohamed morsi has been very much involved in trying to achieve a cease-fire together with representatives from turkey, from qatar. president and the secretary of state, the u.s. president, they've been talking to all sorts of leaders. let's see what happens. i'm only a few miles north of the gaza border right now. it's eerie here. the cafes are pretty much deserted. i was walking along the mediterranean beach. normally there would be a lot of people, it's a beautiful
israel is not really complaining. >> interesting to watch. >> when they said president obama could not work with netanyahu, it's interesting to see them work on a peace deal. >> nice to have you with us, dana, as always. >>> "newsroom" with carol costello begins right now. see you back here tomorrow morning. hey, carol. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. we begin with breaking news. a possible cease fire about to take hold in the israel/gaza conflict. the news comes from egypt's president, trying to broker a truce. minutes ago he declared that israel will soon halt its air strikes on gaza. along egypt's border with gaza, reza sayeh. tell us more. >> reporter: we don't want to jump to conclusions. we should be very cautious. there are growing signs from where we are standing in egypt that there could a closing in on a truce or cease fire. latest sign is a statement made by egyptian president mohamed morsi, according to state tv. he said that, quote, israeli gra aggression would end on tuesday. that, of course, is today. that's consistent with
are not calling it a truce, but they're not calling it a cease-fire either. it appears that israel and hamas are on the verge of agreeing to a time-out. standing down on attacks that have bloodied the region for the last six days. the latest technology toll, 118 people, 114 of them palestinian have been killed as rockets and missiles crisscrossed the skies over hamas-controlled gaza. amidst the shelling, the sound everyone wanted to hear, egypt's president mohamed morsi suggesting progress in attempts at brokering a cease-fire. and backing hamas, released a statement saying, the travesty of the israel aggression on gaza will end in a few hours. we're going to get to the details of all of this and the apparent pause in fighting in just a moment. but first, we want to look at the united states role and all the various players that are involved in this. and in about an hour, secretary of state hillary clinton is to meet with israel prime minister benjamin netanyahu. tomorrow, she is scheduled to meet with the palestinian authority. mahmoud abbas. he's in the west bank. that's on the opposite si
.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hillary clinton's arriving soon in jerusalem about three hours or so from now. she'll go to ramallah, then on to cairo. why would she be meeting with the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas? he has nothing to do with what is taking place in hamas and is this really something that is more symbolic here? >> there's a lot of symbol itch because the u.s. has a lot at stake in the palestinian authority leadership of abbas and the prime minister. the u.s. has had very good relations with the palestinian leader whose believe in a two-state solution. israel and palestine. there's a very good relationship there and the u.s. provides extensive economic assistance to the palestinian authority on the west bank. but you know what? the problem for the palestinian authority is, in recent days, as hamas has engaged in this continuing struggle with israel, its reputation, at least in the palestinian community and i
, too. >>> the sense of urgency is growing by the hour. along the israel-gaza border. hamas militants are hammering targets deep inside enemy territory as we speak, infli inflicting damage, casualties and sparking panic. air sirens wailed for a third straight day in tel aviv after hamas fired a rocket toward the sea side city. the rocket was intercepted. israeli soldiers backed up in armored vehicles are going to the border raising the specter of a possible ground war. all 30,000 troops mobilized and 70,000 more on the way. as the situation he is escalate does the death toll. now our senior international correspondent has been in the middle of all the action in gaza city. sarah, thanks for joining us. what's happening there right now? >> reporter: thank you, gary. yeah, we can hear right now drones over gaza. and that sound, it sounds very much like a lawnmower. it's been going on for hours and hours and hours. we know a lot about drones. israel uses them quite often. they can stay up in the air. they're unmanned, obviously, for more than 20 hours depending on the payload. so if they'
so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. new flashpoint in the isra israel/gaza conflict threatens to implode today's peace talks. a bomb rips apart a bus in tel aviv, israel's second largest city. 22 people injured and tensions rise again across the region. hamas praises the attack. it's not claiming responsibility. in gaza, streets are empty as civilians brace for the israeli response. so far, secretary of state hillary clinton, the challenge of brokering a cease fire, it grows even more daunting this morning. more on those diplomatic efforts in a minute. first the latest details on that bus attack. sara sidner is on the phone from tel aviv. what's the latest, sara? >> reporter: where the victims of this bus attack are. we know that now 22 people have been injured. some of those were inside the bus, some of the people were outside of the bus. there are two very serious injuries, both of them teenagers according to hospital officials here and they are doing surgery as we speak. what we dough do know is that so far doctors are saying that all the victims are expected to s
medicare plans that may be right for you. call now. ♪ >>> tensions rise in the middle east as israel trades fire with its neighbors. overnight israel's military says its air strikes hit key palestinian targets in the gaza strip, including what is described as a terror tunnel and a weapons storage facility. in three straight days of fighting, six palestinians have been killed, and another 30 wounded. according to the israeli military, more than 110 rockets hit southern israel injuring at least four civilians. today in northern israel israeli military sources report hitting syrian targets after two days of cross-border fire. officials say its retaliation for mortar shells that hit near a military post in golan heights. this marks the first time israel has fired on syria since 1973. cnn senior international correspondent sarah is joining us from jerusalem to talk a little bit about all of this that's taking place, and you had a chance, an exclusive, to sit down with israel's president simon peres to talk about what is taking place there. it is somewhat alarming, the escalating violence. does h
in negotiating the israel/hamas cease-fire. today, protesters set fire to a symbol of morsi's power, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, egypt. morsi supporters clashed with protesters there. morsi is defending his new powers, saying he's not taking sides and the steps he took are meant to achieve political and social stability. reza sayah joins us live in cairo. reza, is morsi's government strong enough, so early in this administration, to withstand this level of protests? >> reporter: well, we're going to find out in the coming weeks, but the political landscape is certainly in his favor. he's got the backing of police and security forces, but make no mistake, these are demonstrators, protesters that are determined and energized. many say one of the outcomes of the 2011 revolution was that many egyptians lost their fear and inhibition to protests and speak up. in other words, from now on, if they don't like something, they're not going to be afraid to speak up and say it and that's what we're seeing today, thousands of angry demonstrators filing into tahrir square and other egy
it is appalling. w? . . >>> there are signs of the truce between israel and hamas is holding this weekend. palestinian sources say israel has eased restrictions on gazan fishermen, allowing them to go up to six miles from shore. the fishermen had been restricted from going more than about three miles into the mediterranean. also palestinian farmers have resumed tending their land along the israeli border. a hamas official says that egyptian and israeli officials are expected to meet monday to discuss details of that cease-fire. >>> to egypt, what's happening there now makes it look like the arab spring never ended. this is the scene tonight in cairo. demonstrators back spending the night in tahrir square. president mohamed morsi has announced sweeping new powers for himself ordering egyptian courts not to overturn any decree or law issued since he took office. this dramatic video is from the city of damanur where members of the muslim brotherhood exchanged gunfire with anti-morsi protesters. reza sayah is tracking the story for us in cairo. >> reporter: demonstrations continue against egy
two rocket launch sites. militants fired another rock neat southern israel. six palestinians have been killed and 30 wounded. for israelis have also been hurt. over in the west bank city of ramallah, they're starting to the process to exhume the body of yasser arafat, the former palestinian president. looking for evidence that they might have been murdered. arafat died in pair ras in 2004 thought to be a blood disease. rumors have circulated for years that he was poisoned and earlier this year, a murder investigation was actually opened in france. want to bring in michael holmes here. you knew yasser arafat well. i had a chance to see him at the white house once during the clinton administration. you sat down at least on six different occasions and got to know this guy. >> i did over the years. i covered the second intefadeh around that time and early 20000, late 1990s and intervi interviewed him a number of time, april '02, surrounded by israeli forces, and we followed a bunch of protesters who defied that, went in to see him, and warning shots were fired in front of our group and beh
challenges, like iran's nuclear ambitions before israel strikes. traying so stop the bloody civil war in syria, that is trying to kill people, and dealing with terrorism through deadly drone strikes. how does it make headway? cnn reporter ellise lav it and susan kelli, they're our experts on these topics. together this power team wrote a column on cnn.com security clearance blog about the president's world of challenges. great to see you guys all at once. let's tackle some of this. i want to start with you. let's talk syria. more than 32,000 have died in nearly the two years of fighting in your article you say some official advisory -- might take a muscular approach to the crisis. what does that look like? >> i think, first of all, you could see a morrow bust effort to -- >> they realize that these islamists are all the ones with the guns and the money and, therefore, they would have the power in the future of syria, so i think they maied might aid them a little bit more. i also think that there could be support for no fly zone. turkey has said that it could put patriot missile on the
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)